WinRing.txt	Window Ring					Mar 25, 2008

Author:  Charles E. Campbell  <NdrchipO@ScampbellPfamily.AbizM>
	  (remove NOSPAM from Campbell's email first)
Copyright:    Copyright (C) 2004-2008 Charles E. Campbell {{{1
              Permission is hereby granted to use and distribute this code,
              with or without modifications, provided that this copyright
              notice is copied with it. Like anything else that's free,
              WinRing.vim is provided *as is* and comes with no warranty
              of any kind, either expressed or implied. By using this
              plugin, you agree that in no event will the copyright
              holder be liable for any damages resulting from the use
              of this software.


==============================================================================
1. Contents						winring-contents

	1. Contents......................: winring-contents
	2. WinRing Install...............: winring-install
	3. WinRing Manual................: winring
	4. WinRing Example...............: winring-example
	5. WinRing History...............: winring-history


==============================================================================
2. WinRing Manual					winring :R :RShow

:[N]R
	The current buffer in the window is hidden (to see is listed, use
	:ls) and placed onto the window's "killring".  The Nth previous
	buffer to have been stored on the ring (default: 1) is brought up for
	editing.  If N is zero, then an empty buffer is brought up for
	editing.  Empty windows are not saved onto the killring, however.

:[N]R!
	Like :[N]R, but the Nth next buffer is brought up for editing.  If N
	is zero, then an empty buffer is brought up for editing.  Empty
	windows are not saved onto the killring, however.

:R [files]
	Like :[N]R, the current buffer in the window is hidden and placed onto
	the window's killring.  The specified files are also saved onto the
	window's killring; the last one is brought up for editing.

:R! [files]
	Like :R [files], but the files are placed onto the killring in the
	opposite order.  The first file is brought up for editing.

:RShow
	Shows the contents of the current window's ring buffer.  Subsequent
	:R commands will update the ring buffer display.
:RShow!
	Turn off the display of the ring buffer contents.


==============================================================================
3. WinRing Install					winring-install

	* place WinRing.tar.gz into your:
	     Unix/Linux:  $HOME/.vim
	     Windows   : ..wherever..\vimfiles
	  directory

	* gunzip WinRing.tar.gz

	* tar -oxvf WinRing.tar

	* Update your help tags:
	  Unix/Linux:		  | Windows:
	    vim			  |   vim
	    :helptags ~/.vim/doc  |   :helptags ..wherever../vimfiles/doc
	    :q                    |   :q

	* As a minimum, your <.vimrc> file should contain:
		set nocp
		filetype plugin on

	These steps will result in the following files under your
	.vim/ or vimfiles\ directory:

		plugin/WinRingPlugin.vim
		autoload/WinRing.vim
		doc/WinRing.txt


==============================================================================
4. WinRing Example					winring-example

As an example, assume that one has opened one or more windows.  In one such
window:

	:R tmp2 tmp3 tmp4

This will load that window's killring with the current buffer (if not empty)
and buffers tmp2, tmp3, and tmp4.  The last such buffer will be displayed for
editing.  To edit another buffer on the killring:

	:R

Now buffer tmp3 will be opened for editing.  To see what's being edited,

	:RShow

To go forwards in the killring, type

	:R!

which results in tmp4 being opened for editing again.


==============================================================================
5. WinRing History					winring-history

	v1  Dec 30, 2005 * Initial Release of WinRing

" vim: ts=8